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Koheilan Adjuze OA

http://www.athenaarabians.com/Artiklar_hingstar/koheilan_adjuze_oa.htm

Gives me goosebumps to read about these lines and to once again see the pictures.

I am fairly certain that many of your bloodlines will have these foundations in them. It is great to see some of the pictures because I had long since lost most of them on an old hard drive crash. I am going to store them on SmugMug now. :)

D'Arcy

Bairactar OA Bloodlines

http://www.athenaarabians.com/Artiklar_hingstar/bairactar_oa.htm

You will find this of great interest - for those of you that have any Polish line bloodstock! Be sure to cut and save the pictures to your databases.

D'Arcy

  • STEP SEVEN: Now add the second line to the right halter ring. Cross it over the back to mirror the other line and quietly let the lines rub across the horse's loins and hips. Have the handler reassure the horse, and make certain the horse stands quietly for this lesson. With the person in front still controlling the horse, take the horse through the obstacles including the star and labyrinth.


    You can practice your turning skills
    by using a single driving line around
    a post or with a chair as shown.
    Practice moving from the neutral position
    in each hand to turn in the opposite direction.


     
  • STEP EIGHT: Uncross the driving lines. You should be about eight feet behind the horse. Stand just off to one side when you drive, so you can see the horse's eye, and he can see you. At this point, the "driver" can start to give the signals. Be sure to tell your helper at the horse's head when you are going to stop and turn. As the horse begins to listen to the driver, the helper can start to move away from the horse, giving him a longer line and turning the wand around to the Grace of the Cheetah (the soft end of the wand is toward the horse and the wand is held near the button by the handler). To turn the horse, slide up the line in the direction you are turning and step slightly in that direction. When asking the horse to stop, take the slack out of the line, close your fingers as you ask for a halt and then give back a bit of slack. The horse stops in balance on the release-not on the take. Remember to stay balanced over your feet- avoid planting your feet and bracing back for a halt, as this will only make the horse pull forward or raise his head. As you ask for a "whoa," be sure to give your horse time to process the information: The command will take a couple of seconds to make its way from your brain to your body, to the horse's body, to his brain and back to his body Once the horse is responding to the driver the lead can be removed and the "leader" moves back out of the way perhaps using just the wand if necessary.


    Practice using the lines and giving signals
    by "driving" a person. The weight
    of the driving lines is significant
    when they are attached to the halter.
    It is important to have "supported
    slack" in the lines as shown.


     
If you have a great deal of experience ground driving, these, steps may seem drawn out. However, we've found this to be a safe way of starting a horse ground driving which can be done by almost anyone. The handler at the horse's head allows the driver to learn how to steer and helps the horse accept signals from behind him within a few lessons. There's little risk of injury or having a bad experience, which can be difficult to undo.

Tip: "Bridging" your driving lines keeps you more balanced and more aware of where your hands are and what they are doing. It makes a frame around the horse and maintains the connection between horse and driver. To prevent tripping over the end of the driving lines, pick up the two ends between the little and ring fingers in one hand. You can leave the end of the lines there as you bridge back and forth from one side to the other. This photo shows the ends of the lines held in the left hand while there is still abridge taken between the right and left hand.




by Robyn Hood, IceFarm, from TTEAM Up With Your Horse (now TTEAM Connections), copyright 2001 (printed here with permission).

  • STEP FOUR: Walk the horse forward and allow the single line to touch the hindquarters and move down the leg. To teach the horse to override the flight instinct when something gets around his lower leg, slide the rope down the leg and when it touches just below the hock, ask the horse to stop. Then reward your horse with a stroke from the wand and perhaps a small bite of grain.

    If your horse is unsure about the driving lines, a bit of grain will also encourage him to relax and breathe. Use a flat feed pan or a Frisbee with just a handful or two of grain spread around the pan. This way the horse has to feel around for the grain rather than just diving into a bucket and thinking only about the food.

    After a couple of times of being asked to halt when the line gets below the hock, your horse should begin to slow down whenever the line goes below the hock. This is a lesson in safety; should your horse ever become ensnared in wire or brush, he is much more likely to stop and think instead of acting instinctively in flight. At this point, if your horse is afraid of the line, have the person at the head stop the horse. Then (assuming you are controlling the driving line), come up the line toward the horse's head with the grain.



    If your horse is at all nervous about the lines,
    you can dispel some of his anxiety by walking
    up from behind and giving him a bite of grain.
    Or go back a step, taking the line off the halter
    and tying it around the neck as you do in neckline driving.


     
  • STEP FIVE: Invite the horse to turn his head and reach back to eat the grain. When a horse is afraid he will often stiffen his neck and become rigid rather than bend his neck and look back with- out moving his hindquarters. Walk the horse for- ward and stop several times. Walk up from both sides to be sure the horse can turn his head back in both directions. Take him into the labyrinth and star poles to help him relax and focus as you go through these steps.


    Cross the single line over the horse's back
    so that it rests on the off side.
    Then stroke the horse's hindquarters
    and leg with the rope. Continue the lesson
    by walking the horse through the obstacles.
    Add the second line and cross it over the horse's back.


     
  • STEP SIX: Take your single line and cross it over the back to let it touch the horse on the opposite side. If your horse is nervous when the line is on the right, have your handler move over to this side of the horse (rethreading the chain through the opposite side of the hatter rings first). It is always safest for both people to be on the same side. Even if your horse does not seem to be afraid from the left side, it is worthwhile to take a few minutes to see how he reacts to the right side. Some horses are perfectly quiet with the line on the left side and become terrified when it goes over to the right side. Lead the horse through a few pole exercises before proceeding to the next step.


    Now uncross the driving lines.
    You can now give the signals to turn and stop
    from your driving position behind the horse.
    It is important for you to communicate clearly
    with your helper at the horse's head;
    this also is the most challenging part of the exercises.


  • STEP FOUR: Walk the horse forward and allow the single line to touch the hindquarters and move down the leg. To teach the horse to override the flight instinct when something gets around his lower leg, slide the rope down the leg and when it touches just below the hock, ask the horse to stop. Then reward your horse with a stroke from the wand and perhaps a small bite of grain.

    If your horse is unsure about the driving lines, a bit of grain will also encourage him to relax and breathe. Use a flat feed pan or a Frisbee with just a handful or two of grain spread around the pan. This way the horse has to feel around for the grain rather than just diving into a bucket and thinking only about the food.

    After a couple of times of being asked to halt when the line gets below the hock, your horse should begin to slow down whenever the line goes below the hock. This is a lesson in safety; should your horse ever become ensnared in wire or brush, he is much more likely to stop and think instead of acting instinctively in flight. At this point, if your horse is afraid of the line, have the person at the head stop the horse. Then (assuming you are controlling the driving line), come up the line toward the horse's head with the grain.



    If your horse is at all nervous about the lines,
    you can dispel some of his anxiety by walking
    up from behind and giving him a bite of grain.
    Or go back a step, taking the line off the halter
    and tying it around the neck as you do in neckline driving.


     
  • STEP FIVE: Invite the horse to turn his head and reach back to eat the grain. When a horse is afraid he will often stiffen his neck and become rigid rather than bend his neck and look back with- out moving his hindquarters. Walk the horse for- ward and stop several times. Walk up from both sides to be sure the horse can turn his head back in both directions. Take him into the labyrinth and star poles to help him relax and focus as you go through these steps.


    Cross the single line over the horse's back
    so that it rests on the off side.
    Then stroke the horse's hindquarters
    and leg with the rope. Continue the lesson
    by walking the horse through the obstacles.
    Add the second line and cross it over the horse's back.


     
  • STEP SIX: Take your single line and cross it over the back to let it touch the horse on the opposite side. If your horse is nervous when the line is on the right, have your handler move over to this side of the horse (rethreading the chain through the opposite side of the hatter rings first). It is always safest for both people to be on the same side. Even if your horse does not seem to be afraid from the left side, it is worthwhile to take a few minutes to see how he reacts to the right side. Some horses are perfectly quiet with the line on the left side and become terrified when it goes over to the right side. Lead the horse through a few pole exercises before proceeding to the next step.


    Now uncross the driving lines.
    You can now give the signals to turn and stop
    from your driving position behind the horse.
    It is important for you to communicate clearly
    with your helper at the horse's head;
    this also is the most challenging part of the exercises.


8 STEPS TO SUCCESS WITH GROUND DRIVING

Before you begin: Place a body wrap on your horse (see "Body ropes and body wraps," Sept./Oct. 1997, p. 8). The body wrap helps keep the horse "in touch" with his hindquarters and helps him feel more secure with the driving lines on his body.
  • STEP ONE: If your horse has never worn a saddle or surcingle or he has a tendency to be "cinchy" or cold-backed, start each session with belly lifts. They will give him a chance to experience pressure under the belly without having downward pressure on the back. Using a folded towel or surcingle (without wither pads), start just behind the elbow; lift slowly until you can feel a contact with the belly (if the horse moves or objects, back off and just lightly make contact). Pause for 6 to 15 seconds, then slowly come down. The coming down should take twice as long as the lift. If you lift to a count of 3 or 4, then come down by counting backwards from 6 or 8. Move back about six inches and repeat. Do this as far back toward the flank as the horse is comfortable with.


    To prepare your horse for ground driving,
    first do some belly lifts with the surcingle
    to encourage him to breathe deeply,
    lower his head and relax.
    This will give him a comfortable
    experience of having pressure under the belly.
    Gently lift, pause, and slowly release.


     
  • STEP TWO: Before doing up the girth, hold the surcingle in one hand and the girth in the other. Slowly lift with your hand, holding the girth against the belly Pause for 4 to 10 seconds, and then slowly release the lift. This gives the horse a chance to become accustomed to pressure down on the back and up on the belly with release from the pressure rather than just doing the girth up. He will also learn to breathe when he feels pressure from the saddle.


    Lift slightly with the girth
    as you steady the surcingle
    with the other hand. Slowly release.
    This gives the horse a chance to learn to breathe
    when he feels the pressure of the girth.


     
  • STEP THREE: Starting on the left side of the horse, attach one line to the halter, running it first through a ring, which is attached to a second ring on the surcingle. You can use double-ended snaps to attach the ring, allowing the line to be raised or lowered on the surcingle.

    The snap acts as an extender to bring the line out from the horse's body and serve as a leading rein. Stroke the wand down the hindquarters and leg to accustom the horse to the line. At the same time, ask your handler to give a signal back on the lead and stroke the chest and front legs with the wand, asking your equine pupil to stand still.

    Start out with a single driving line-this way, if the horse is afraid, he can move away from the line rather than bolting. At this point, the handler at -the horse's head is giving all of the commands, so it is essential that both of you communicate with each other for stopping, starting and turning.



    "Do up" the girth loosely at first.
    Use the breast collar to keep
    the surcingle from slipping back.
    Attach one line through the ring
    on the surcingle to the halter.
    Stroke the horse's hindquarters
    and legs with the line.
    The handler at the head strokes with the wand.
Icelandic Horse Connection

Learn the Ropes of Ground Driving

Link to this page!
By Robyn Hood, IceFarm

You can safely teach your horse the building blocks of training before you ever place your toe in the stirrup.

When most people think of "breaking" a horse, they think of saddling, bridling and riding that horse. And while many skilled trainers can accomplish this in just a few sessions, it takes a great deal of skill and timing. Many people overlook the opportunity to teach a horse from the ground the basic building blocks that will be needed under saddle. Teaching these skills from the ground minimizes the risk of injury to either horse or handler.

When my sister Linda Tellington-Jones was 12 years old, she discovered that ground driving made young horses much easier to start. In the 1960s, when she taught seminars to amateurs at the University of California on starting young horses safely and quietly, ground driving was an integral part of the process. In the May/June 1999 issue, we described the steps of neckline driving, a valuable TTEAM training tool for both young horses starting their training and older horses who
  • exhibit fear of things behind them or kick
  • travel above the bit, behind the bit (over-bent) or are ewe-necked
  • rush through narrow spaces or swing around to face things they are afraid of
  • are afraid to cross water or jump ditches
  • are blind in one eye or are losing sight.
While neckline driving can be used on its own, it is also the ideal preparation for ground driving. Driving teaches horses the "building blocks" of training, including turning, stopping and going forward to a signal from behind. It can also serve as an effective refresher course for older horses. No matter what your horse's level of training, ground driving can help teach him to
  • stop from a light signal from the rein, turn in any direction, and stop in balance
  • overcome a fear of things behind him or of going through narrow spaces
  • improve his response if he is overly sensitive or unresponsive to the leg
  • be self-confident and flexible on both sides of the body
  • have a 360-degree "view" of his body improving balance and self-image
  • load into a trailer without difficulty
  • prepare for work in harness.
YOUR "TOOLS" FOR GROUND DRIVING
  • flat nylon halter that fits correctly; i.e., not too loose or low on the nose
  • wand (four-foot stiff whip) and lead line with a 30-inch chain
  • a helper
  • two driving lines, each three-eighths inch (7 mm) and about 21 feet long
  • surcingle with breast collar or rope
  • body wrap (two elastic bandages or polo wraps tied together).
DRIVE FROM THE HALTER

We start ground driving from the halter rather than from a bridle and bit. Carrying a bit changes the horse's balance, giving him another new thing to deal with. And when you ground drive, the distance between the horse's head and your hand is 15 to 18 feet, which puts a lot of weight on the bit and lessens the chance of clear, consistent signals. Working from the halter will also keep the horse's body in a lengthened frame and keep his head level. (Please review the steps of neckline driving in the May/June'99 issue before proceeding.)

Training to Ground Drive with Long Lines

TRAINING YOUR HORSE TO "GROUND DRIVE",
OR USING THE "LONG LINES"


It isn't unusual for people to ask how to teach their horse to "ground drive". Here is a brief description of how I teach mine to become familiar and comfortable with this great training tool.

I first make sure the youngster is very familiar with "lunging" . I train my young horses to lunge by first getting them to walk in a circle at the end of a long cotton lead rope. This teaches them the basics of going out away from me, yet teaches them to be dependent on me for what they are supposed to do, ie., walk or stop. I make it a point when I am doing this to not allow the horse to come in towards me when they stop, but to stay at the end of the lead and I come to them. As they get older, I change to the lunge line and ask them to go farther and farther out on it as they become confident. I will occasionally ask for a trot, and when doing this, I will often walk along with them so they are not constantly on a circle. This is a fairly simplified version and the actual process usually takes a few months for the young horse to become comfortable and confident in my commands and body language.

I like to start the horse ground driving as a two year old only because that has given him/her a lot of time for the basics and they are more in tune with me and are ready to progress. This can be done at any age as long as your basic training with the lunge line are good and solid. I start out by making the horse stand, then attach the end of the lunge line with the snap to one side of the halter an the loose end to the other side of the halter. I then stand at the horse's side and have a direct contact to the halter on one side and the other length of the lunge line is across the horse's neck by the withers. I then quietly start running the line over the horse's back and over the hindquarters while talking quietly and asking the horse to stand. This first session is sort of "sacking" the horse out with the lines so he gets used to them touching and resting on him everywhere. One of the things I spend quite a bit of time on is the hindquarters. Some horses will be nervous or upset by having the lines under their tail or between their legs. I like to make sure the horse is used to this feel before I proceed to the actual lunging and "driving" process so I don't have a horse that wants to "bolt". Most horses have no problems with this part of the training, but if you have one that is particularly sensitive to the lines touching its belly or under its tail, etc., it would be wise to not proceed on to the next steps until you have your horse comfortable with the lines. The described exercise above should be repeated daily until your horse just stands comfortably and relaxed while the lines are flipped around his/her body.

It is important to me that the youngster stand still for all these things because if you are ground driving him and he gets the lines between his legs or caught under his tail, he needs to know to stand so you can untangle him and the lines. On some youngsters this takes weeks, on most it takes one or two times because they are already convinced you know what you are doing and will take care of them.

The next step I take is to start the horse lunging at a walk with both the lines attached on opposite sides of the halter. Then I apply more pressure on the line on the outside line to "pull" his head and body more away from me and while doing this I walk more behind rather than beside the horse. Then as we are moving along, I apply enough pressure to "reverse" the direction we are going and take a step or two directly behind the horse then since we have reversed, I am on the opposite side and we continue to walk. I will do this many more times during this session. Some horses who are a little insecure will have to be encouraged to move forward and I do this by gently slapping the lines across his body and re-inforce the command to walk. I have never had a horse take off on me while doing this, I think mostly because I make sure they know the voice commands and have confidence in what I am doing with them even if they don't understand!

After doing this for a day or so, I start spending more time walking directly behind them and occasionally ask for a trot...I like them to trot slooowww...because I have to run to keep up!! Often the first time you do this, the fact that you are running behind them make startle them a little, but I just talk to them...saying "eaaasssyyy" and I haven't had a problem.

Once the horse becomes broke to the saddle, if it is a Western saddle, you can run your lines through the stirrups and this will help teach the horse to move with a lower head carriage. This really teaches the horse to give with his head when you want to stop or turn also!! So when you start bitting him he already knows a lot of what he is supposed to do. I hope I haven't left anything out, if you have any questions, please feel free to email me on it . I may add your question to the bottom of this article with the answer! This works for me and I hope I gave you a starting point!!

Please remember to always be safe while working with horses! It might be a good idea to wear your helmet while doing this as in some rare instances your horse may decide to rear, and a helmet may help avoid injury. When using the lunge line or long lines with your horse, NEVER wrap any line around your hand or any part of your body! Gloves should be worn to avoid "rope burns". If you don't know how to lunge a horse, it would be best that you work with an equine professional who can teach you how to do this first.

 

Mary E. Chwalek,
Best wishes to all of you.  Hug your horses, your families, and most of all yourselves.  These are difficult times to weather.  However, weather them, we will!

Fireworks Ride

Raquel and I took Valentina and Indy to the Fireworks Ride in Santa Cruz, CA.  We entered the 25 mile.  It was an incredible course and the ride management was superb!  The entire experience was a positive and uplifting one.  

Although we came in dead last with 2.41 hours in overtime.  I didn't mind.  We have not been able to work our horses well due to the smoke in the air from all of the forest fires.  The horses were great.  They didn't even mind the river crossing with water up to their bellies.  I think Indy was a little surprised.  I think that is the very first time he experienced that.  Valentina was head strong and couldn't wait for the challenge.  Now, this same mare, freaked out at a 2 foot wide stream with black mud holes on each side!  That was just at the beginning of the ride.  She jumped and jumped again!  Into the side of a hill dumping me onto a rock.  Thank goodness I am a true believer in HELMETS!  And I was glad that I had just picked up the newest model of the Tipperary.  It has one of the highest safety ratings.  Although I was hurt and I probably should have gone back to camp.  I didn't want Raquel to think life was all about not meeting tough challenges.  So, we continued on for the rest of the 25 miles.  

The first 7 miles of the ride were the most technical that I have ridden to date.  Lots of steep climbs, steep downhills, deep sand with steep steps in and out, the river crossing with water up to their bellies.  If you stepped over a foot there was about a 4 foot drop off.  Came out of the river with lots of kudos and GREAT JOB!   That made me wonder if this had been a difficult crossing for some.  Raquel later found out that someone went into the deep end with their horse and got hurt.  So, I felt good about Valentina making that water crossing.  We got into the Vet check which was a trot through for us.  I had to stop and check tack, us the facilities (outhouse), and see if the horses wanted to take food and water.  We had about 10 minutes there and started out on the 11 mile Wilder Loop.  

The 11 mile Wilder Loop had one two water tanks.  We were not able to sponge our horses at the stop.  Which was not good because most of the ride was out in the open sun, in the heat of the day, with very little green to graze on and get moisture into the horses.  So, it was in my estimated opinion, if we wanted to have horses under us to the finish, we better take it slower than we would have liked.  We had already lost 1.5 hours by that loop and needed the loop to make up lots of time.  I'd rather have a healthy horse than a good finish time at that rate. 

We got back into the vet check.  Valentina pulsed down to 40 within seconds!  I was AMAZED!!!!   She didn't want to drink much water and she didn't want anything to eat at first.  It took her about 10 minutes to calm down, watch other horses eating, and drinking, that she decided she could take the time to eat and drink.  Indy didn't wait he dove in right away.  I don't ever worry about if he is going to take care of himself or not.  We had a 30 minute hold time and headed back to the vet check to clear.  They said, "you can be trailered back or continue on, your horses are cleared, but you won't make the 1pm cut off."  It was 1pm at that time.  I said if the horses are okay then we will finish the last 7 miles.  

The last seven miles were the longest seven miles I have ever ridden in my life.  I wanted to get off my horse and never get back on a horse the rest of my life.  I didn't put any aspirin in my crew bag at the vet check - which was the first thing on my things to remember to do list!  It would have saved me lots of pain on the way back.  I would have not spent so much time on Valentina's back.  I couldn't post after 20 miles so I had to sit the trot.  And believe me all she wanted to do on the way back was TROT~  

We got into the finish and they thought we were some of the 50 milers coming in until they saw the color of the chalk numbers on the horses butts!  LOL!  They were like ohhh, dear, well, ahhhhh you have a 2.41 overtime - sorry!!!  I said no problem!  And the P&R people checked the horses and were like WOW!~   That made me feel good.  We finished and the horses finished very well.  The vet said Indy had some gut sounds to be cautious about but at that point no worries.  We kept a good eye on him and he ate and drank well and had no problems throughout the night.  I was glad that we had holding pens instead of having to high tie them or have them in small holding pens.  I think it helped to have the larger area for them to move around in.  

The food was great.  The awards banquet was nice.  There were lots of people there from our area.  It was the first ride that most could get to that had not been canceled due to smoke problems.  I got to see Joell there and her wonderful Sam!  I just love him.  He is a track rehab and man has Joell done the best job on this guy.  I also got to meet one of her friends, Leah, and her horse.  Another well put together muscled out TB.  I didn't get to spend much time with them and they had left before we got back.  I hope they will be at many more rides!!!

I am still a little sore.  I know that I want to continue with endurance riding.  I just need to address some smaller issues to insure the same mistakes are not duplicated that happened on this ride.  Raquel did FANTASTIC and could have done the ride all by herself if the rules had let her.  Because she is under 17 with less than 500 miles she has to ride with a sponsor.  So, I'll see if she can ride with someone else.  I will only hold her back and that might spoil the experience for her.  And she needs to learn to keep her horses safety and well being first and foremost.   The only way she will learn that is through first hand experience.  Ahh to be that young and 'know it all' would be so refreshing.

The next ride is September 20th.  If I start work I hope that I can get that weekend off.  It will be outside of San Jose.  This will be the first year for this ride.  The ride management, on the other hand, are not new.  I would suspect that it will be a very good ride. 

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